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Anyone here watch MMA / UFC ?

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theman View Drop Down
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    Posted: 01/10/2010 at 9:02pm
Hey guys, i just got into watching MMA at the end of last year, and fascinated on how it evolved. Anyone got any favourite fighters?
I like watching don frye and randy couture, got a soft spot for old timers
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Heimdallalso Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2010 at 9:06pm
You want old timers?
Give me
Marco Ruas
&
Oleg Taktarov

Bas Rutten?
He's a MAN!

Baddest thing about Don Frye was that badass mustache!
LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kenneyy88 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2010 at 9:06pm
I used to watch but its gotten boring with less bjj guys. Not much good martial art technique except cung le, who doesn't really fight anymore.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Heimdallalso Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2010 at 9:08pm
...i hear Anton trotting over as we speak.
I think he's a big BJ Penn guy.

GSP = Baddass
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote theman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2010 at 9:17pm
yeah heimdallalso ive been renting the old ufc's, all the submission holders like oleg, gracie kicked so much butt.
i kinda dont like it now, everyone seems to be too "well rounded" if you know what i mean. Kinda generic
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....
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Big%20smile
Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:



I partially agree.  One on one fight, ground fighting is helpful, if you are taken to the ground.  But against multiple attackers, you will kill yourself if you are locking one opponent while other opponents get the chance to attack you freely. 
 
 
Incorrect, and I speak from fairly extensive experience. Dividing your attention is a sure way to get destroyed. Focusing on one person at a time is the only way to make any progress against multiple opponents. Fortunately, UFC is a sport, not a brawl, so we don't need to worry about that.
 
Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:

 
Besides, if they claimed that it was  as close as the fight in the real world, well, during grappling, the first thing we need to do is to gouge opponent's eyes, or crush his balls in your hand (both are forbidden in the UFC).  We don't talk fairness here during real world fighting.
 
 
Actually, the early UFCs did allow hitting, kicking, etc., to the groin (balls). In fact, the only things that weren't allowed in the early UFC were biting, eye-gouging, and fish-hooking. It was almost pure NHB--and utterly brutal.
 
Also, those "dirty tricks" don't put anyone at an advantage when they're allowed. If someone can beat you with a few rules, via controlling the distance and timing of the striking game, dominating the clinch, and owning you on the ground, then allowing all the eye-gouging in the world isn't going to save you. Remember, the guy who can beat you at everything else can now eye-gouge too. Wink The controls (rules) in the UFC are there to make it safer for the athletes and dignified enough to put it on TV. It is still a valid enough representation of a "real" fight. 
 
Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:



Jujitsu, judo, aikido, etc. are good martial arts and we need to master them to be a complete martial artist, but we can't solely rely on them alone.  Muay Thai, Tae Kwon Do, Kungfu, etc. are good to master too.
 
Jujitsu and judo are just antiquated and now incomplete forms. Aikido and Kung Fu are rubbish. I don't mean to be rude, but it's a fact. Pure rubbish--as it pertains to fighting. I'm sure they're highly enjoyable forms of exercise or meditation for some people, which is great. But they're not valid combat styles, not even remotely. The only worthwhile forms of fighting are submission grappling, wrestling, boxing, and/or Muay Thai.
 
Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:


Peace guys, I was just bored.
 
Fair enough. I didn't mean to jump all over you, in case you get that impression. You just said some things that, although commonly thought by most "lay people", are just incorrect and I want to nip the fairytales in the bud. Big%20smile Hopefully, no hard feelings.  

Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:


And we are just talking about bare hand combat, not with weapon.  The first thing being taught when you fight in real word is that you need to use anything around you as weapon.  If we have baseball bat, why we need to punch with bare hand?
 
Do you really want to beat someone with a baseball bat? I don't suggest it. Have you ever looked someone in the eyes while doing serious physical harm to them? If not, I don't suggest that either.
 
The sport aspect of MMA is amazing, challenging, and fulfilling. Real "street fights" are none of the above (well, maybe challenging). Sports are great, violence is not. I don't mean to be over-reactive to your last comment, but I've experienced enough to know that the bravado and machismo surrounding violence are empty and, unfortunately, too often venerated.
 
I don't mean to be a d*ck, but this is stuff I've encountered all too often and wanted to address. Sorry to make an example out of you; I know you were just killing time making conversation. I will now step down off my soap box. Big%20smile
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hans Regenkurt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 4:41am
The styles I regard as still valid and best applicable in real situations is thai boxing - especially elbow strikes to the nose or temple - boxing, kenpo.

Of course being good at ground fighting is a must and a substantial advantage over opponents unskilled at it but not worthwhile doing when fightting multiple opponents.


I especially dislike taekwondo because it does not allow thigh kicks, proper hook shots and there is no ground fighting.

Out of the karate styles I appreciate kyokushin the most because it teaches you to endure physical pain and the whole style is based on bare knuckle rules but its serious drawback is the proper training of hand usage and a simple kyokushin guy would suck to a boxer in no time.

All these are true but being an effective fighter eventually depends on how psycho somebody is.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 4:44am
Anderson Silva  Thumbs%20Up
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Krantz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 6:24am
"Jujitsu and judo are just antiquated and now incomplete forms."

I won't lol at this only because of due respect of a fellow MA practitioner It's true that these styles arent currently prominent under MMA rules, but the big factor here are naked bodies of participants, which nullifies allmost every grappling techniques of these schools. How often you can expect that your "real fight" opponent will attack you with a naked torso? Of course Judo wasn't even meant to be a valid "real" fighting style (its a sport, where safety of participants is of first priority), but ju jitsu is still as deadly as you can think of, and you can expect that the very first grapple of a Ju jitsu practitioner means an end of the fight - exactly the same way as a solid, connected kick.   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Chigurh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 12:53pm
Originally posted by Krantz Krantz wrote:

"Jujitsu and judo are just antiquated and now incomplete forms."

I won't lol at this only because of due respect of a fellow MA practitioner It's true that these styles arent currently prominent under MMA rules, but the big factor here are naked bodies of participants, which nullifies allmost every grappling techniques of these schools. How often you can expect that your "real fight" opponent will attack you with a naked torso? Of course Judo wasn't even meant to be a valid "real" fighting style (its a sport, where safety of participants is of first priority), but ju jitsu is still as deadly as you can think of, and you can expect that the very first grapple of a Ju jitsu practitioner means an end of the fight - exactly the same way as a solid, connected kick.   
 
Let me qualify my claim Big%20smile. I knew my reply was going to be lengthy (as my replies so often are) so I was trying to simplify my statements, which led to a few over simplifications. First, I'm making a distinction between Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and "regular" Jujitsu--the regular style being the style I called "incomplete". Second, I should say that when I trained, my speciality was grappling--although I'm no slouch standing up. Wink My point is, I certainly don't have any prejudice against ground fighting. Third, Judo and Jujitsu are certainly still useful styles, for sure. However, I called them "incomplete" simply because Brazilian Jiu Jitsu has all the effective elements that Jujitsu and Judo have, and a whole lot more. 
 
However, I (respectfully) disagree with your reference to the "naked torso" factor. Although Judo, Jujitsu, and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu all make excellent use of clothing (for throws, chokes, etc.), I must say that such use is often (but not always) only "useful" when using a gi/kimono. The kimono is very, very thick, reinforced fabric. I've messed around with fellow training partners trying to implement some of the gi-techniques while in street clothes, and most shirt fabrics are simply too delicate and will tear before completion of a choke, for example. Unless someone attacks while wearing a jacket, then I would strongly "argue" that no-gi techniques are still superior.
 
BUT, let me also state that training in gi-techniques is highly advantageous. Wearing a gi/kimono basically means you have a noose around your neck and handles all over your body. When sparring, it's hot, difficult to move, and there are many more ways to get submitted. Such training teaches one patience, supplies endurance, and keeps you sharp. Good stuff.
 
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Originally posted by Rack Rack wrote:

Anderson Silva  Thumbs%20Up
 
Nice... My favorite as well. He's a dangerous, evil man. LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dual700 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 1:30pm
Ooooh maaaan....Big%20smile
Been watching mma since it's existence... Met some fighters from Gina to Tank Abbott, Fedor, etc... I post mma events picks regularly on car audio forum Tongue
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jpenmaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 3:12pm
  Ah good old MMA my other passion.  I am glad to see the sport progressing.  I remember about 5 years ago when i took up BJJ everyone thought i was carzy but after seeing Gracie i knew just a wrestling ground game would not cut it any longer.  Yes with out a Ju jitsu gi it is more difficult to use some subs  Arm bars , americanas,triangles and rear naked chokes are still easy to do even when an opponent  is sweaty.  Some ju jitsu subs are just not going to work though but you know this going into MMA. I thikn people over look the ground control and position of BJJ. I have been really lucky where i live and train.  I have trained with Matt Hughes and Andrei Arlovski.  I think i still have some pics on computer with those guys.  Lesnar is huge for Heavyweight if he can get healthy he may stay on top for a while(Mir is packing on the muscle though) . Silva is just too good , Belfort could stop him if he ever reaches his potential.  205 class is too dangerous for someone to stay on top too long.  GSP is the most well rounded fighter in the world but i think he lacks mental toughness and BJ Penn is one of the greatestno mater what weight class he is in but i think if he would of stayed in light weight he could have been a legend
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote doraemon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 8:40pm
Well, Anton, don't worry about it.  This forum is for discussion and I take no offense on what you are saying.

My point is that Gracie Jujitsu is very good, but I would not back the claim that it is the best one for real world fighting.  I was quoting one of Gracie's family member that said that Gracie Jujitsu is the most effective because most fighting in real world will end up as ground fighting (rephrased).  I strongly agree that we need to learn Gracie Jujitsu to be a complete fighter, as the UFC has repeatedly shown us that many good fighters easily defeated by Gracie when brought to the ground.  But I have also seen that few grapplers were knocked out when they tried to grab but got hit so bad.

I remember reading one of articles in one of martial arts magazine and they did a survey on many experts regarding which martial arts that will give the most benefit to beginners.  They put the limitation of only 3 months of training and the students must have the necessary basics to defend themselves when attacked in real life.  I don't remember the complete Top Ten list, but I remember the first place was for Muay Thai (Thai Boxing) and the last one (10th position) was for AIkido.  The article stressed that any martial arts were good if practiced for a long time (20 years, for example), but here they were talking about the most effective for practical purposes, given a short time frame to learn (not to master).  Aikido is not bad and when learned for 10 - 20 years, the practitioners can defeat  almost anybody.  But in 3 months time, it is no way effective for a beginner.   On the other hand,  Muay Thai gives some basics within 3 months of training.

The other example was Bruce Lee.  He grappled with Judo practitioner Gene LeBel (spelling?) and lost (starting on the ground).  But when asked if he would like to train harder in his grappling technique, he said, "Who can bring me down to the ground?", which although sound arrogant but it was true.  If Bruce would have started the match standing up, LeBel will be knocked out before he even got a chance to grab him.  Bruce Lee did not underestimate ground fighting, he practiced the technique, but it became the last resort, when he was taken into the ground.

I like Bruce Lee's suggestion to take all the good aspects from many martial arts and he even learned a great deal from traditional boxing, which is "distancing".  I always thought that boxing is too primitive until I read many stories where Tae Kwon Do and Karate's black belt were easily defeated by boxers.  Even I know a friend who practice Gracie Jujitsu lost a fight to a boxer.  I am talking boxing here not Thai Boxing.

Sorry, it is just me rambling.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Chigurh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 9:32pm
Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:

Well, Anton, don't worry about it.  This forum is for discussion and I take no offense on what you are saying.
Excellent! It's nice to see another person who is open to discussion, and who doesn't fly off the handle when someone disagrees. Right on.

Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:


My point is that Gracie Jujitsu is very good, but I would not back the claim that it is the best one for real world fighting.  I was quoting one of Gracie's family member that said that Gracie Jujitsu is the most effective because most fighting in real world will end up as ground fighting (rephrased).  I strongly agree that we need to learn Gracie Jujitsu to be a complete fighter, as the UFC has repeatedly shown us that many good fighters easily defeated by Gracie when brought to the ground.  But I have also seen that few grapplers were knocked out when they tried to grab but got hit so bad.
 
I understand your sentiment, but I will add a few things. I definitely believe that Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is the superior fighting style, above all others. However, that isn't to say that every BJJ guy will beat every guy from another style every single time. It just means that, on average, the smart money is on the BJJ guy. Of course, there are many qualifiers. For example, a BJJ guy with 3 months training will likely get destroyed by a Muay Thai guy with 3 years training, etc.
 
That was the whole point of the original UFC. The Gracies started it to demonstrate that BJJ is the superior fighting style; and since Royce, Renzo, Royler, and Rickson were the dominant champs for the first few years of all MMA, I think they provided ample evidence for their claim. It is only after a striker learns BJJ that they stand a chance. They might win with strikes, but they have to learn to defend takedowns and submissions before they can have a hope of victory. So even when a striker beats a BJJ guy, it doesn't mean that kickboxing, for example, is better than BJJ. It just means that the striker was better at BJJ than the BJJ guy was at striking... if you follow.

I think the reason is sheer physics. It's easier to pin someone on the ground than it is to control their movements while standing. Technique becomes more important than strength while grappling, so a trained smaller guy has a better chance against a larger opponent. Smaller guys, no matter how good they are at boxing, often do not have the requisite leverage to generate enough power to knock out a big dude--simply due to the size difference. I've never been knocked out by a smaller opponent, and I've never knocked out an opponent much larger than myself. But I've been submitted by 15 year-old kids, and I've submitted dudes who out-weighed me by 35kg. Big%20smile The ground is the great equalizer! LOL

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote theman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 9:47pm
hey anton, im 5"4, would i stand a chance against a friend who weighs 210 pounds and is 6"3 if i took up BJJ? Big%20smile [this guy knows tae kwon do]

btw, this debate is one of the most civilised i have seen in a LOONG time in this forum [the sid era, among others]

for me theres just too many variables to declare one style is better than the other. as anton stated, years trained if the fighter was sloppy etc
but when i saw bjj at early ufc, i saw with my own eyes, the sheer practicality of it, none of this fancy stances and theory pounded into the student, but straight grappling know how
i lost my racquet

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No style is any better than the other. They all have a weakness. When MMA was first coming out no one knew how defend against BJJ or what they were trying to do. Now since fighters train in so many different styles it is hard to trick your opponents. MMA is more like JKD than anything now. I started off as a wrestler and started training MT for about a year then i got into BJJ. At my school we do MT/american boxing, BJJ and have an MMA class as well. I find the BJJ guys even brown belts have a really hard time in the MMA class. With some many wrestling back ground guys now it is hard for a BJJ guy to control positioning and posture against a good wrestler. There is a saying with BJJ guys take a black belt punch him the face once and he turns into a brown belt punch him in the face again and he becomes a purple belt then blue and finally a white. Since everyone has a greater knowledge of the styles out there MMA is really coming down to talent and skill not just a certain style of fighting dominating. One thing i did see up there was Aikido no one with a black belt in aikido should take up MMA ever. There stance is terrible i mean terrible and almost all joint locks are illegal in MMA
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Chigurh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:00pm
Originally posted by theman theman wrote:

hey anton, im 5"4, would i stand a chance against a friend who weighs 210 pounds and is 6"3 if i took up BJJ? Big%20smile [this guy knows tae kwon do]

btw, this debate is one of the most civilised i have seen in a LOONG time in this forum [the sid era, among others]

for me theres just too many variables to declare one style is better than the other. as anton stated, years trained if the fighter was sloppy etc
but when i saw bjj at early ufc, i saw with my own eyes, the sheer practicality of it, none of this fancy stances and theory pounded into the student, but straight grappling know how
 
The simple answer: Yes, given enough time (approximately a year, depending on your age, athletic ability, and how much you train) you could own your big friend. Big%20smile Remember, BJJ was developed primarily by Helio Gracie, who was a small, skinny, sickly guy. He could destroy opponents much larger than himself--as is the case with most of the Gracies. I think Royler was about your size and he had major success within MMA. Sooo technical.
 
I highly recommend training BJJ. It is truly an eye-opening experience on so many levels. After table tennis, I'd say pure, sport BJJ is one of the most technical sports in the world--especially the gi competitions. Trust me, if you like watching grappling now, with little to no experience in it, then you'll freakin go nuts after you have some training and can actually see the subtleties of what's taking place. So beautiful! Big%20smile
 
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jpenmaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:03pm
I have been to a few NAGA events very cool. With a gi you cannot make any mistakes
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Chigurh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:07pm
Originally posted by jpenmaster jpenmaster wrote:

No style is any better than the other. They all have a weakness. When MMA was first coming out no one knew how defend against BJJ or what they were trying to do.
 
I totally understand what you are saying, but let me pick at it a second. You said that when MMA started, no one knew about BJJ so it dominated. But that's my point--when each person had a particular style to which they were committed, it was only the BJJ guys who rose to the top.
 
Of course when everyone learns everything then it's easy to say that no one style dominates. I agree with that. But only because everyone knows a little bit of everything. In the early years, when a boxer fought Royce (a BJJ guy), he lost to Royce. When a wrestler fought Royce, he lost to Royce. When a Karate guy fought Royce, he lost to Royce.
 
My point is, when you match up pure style against pure style (not mixed style against mixed style) then BJJ is what comes to the top. In that sense, it is superior. But these days everyone knows a bit of everything so it comes down to athleticism, endurance, and cleverness.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jpenmaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:15pm
Yeah but when Royce grabbed an arm no one knew he was going to break it. He was quite brutal in MMA. The fighters did not know what was going to happen in certain positions or what he trying to do. Once people understood BJJ it slowed its dominance. Look at Hughes he know BJJ but is not a black belt(or red) . He is very much American wrestling based and he destroyed Royce if it was not for his pride i think he would. have tapped. Granted Royce was not in his prime but was no old man either. I doubt you will see a pure BJJ guy ever rise to the top again.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jonan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:17pm
I don't like the "sport" (if you can call two people beating each other bloody until one is unconscious or too seriously injured to continue, for the pleasure of onlookers a sport, and no that's not an opinion, violence is stupid and wrong no matter if both sides agree to it) but one of my best friends from college is a lower tournament level MMA fighter and competed in grappling tournaments as well. He said that when he made the jump from grappling to MMA, he said that he would get shocked in early fights when the other person he was fighting would just start punching his face while they were locked on the ground. He loved it though...biggest smile I'd ever seen on him was after he got his nose broken and eyebrow cut and a black eye after fighting one of the top 10 lightweights in the world...not sure what that says about him as a person.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nachalnik Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:18pm

Well, I'm a second degree black belt in Kenpo and I've been doing it for quite some time. I also did a little of BJJ, Russian sambo and have been in a fair share of street fights. The problem with BJJ, as opposed to boxing or kenpo is that the last thing you want to do in a bar or street is to grapple with somebody. There's hard pavement, there's broken glass, there could be friends of a guy you're fighting standing around and just waiting for you to take it to the ground so they can kick the s**t out of you. The best thing in street fights is to remain standing. This is where boxing/ karate/ Muay Thai are pretty handy.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote theman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:24pm
Originally posted by Jonan Jonan wrote:

I don't like the "sport" (if you can call two people beating each other bloody until one is unconscious or too seriously injured to continue, for the pleasure of onlookers a sport, and no that's not an opinion, violence is stupid and wrong no matter if both sides agree to it) 


i think its in human nature to enjoy violence, on ALL LEVELS, everyone has the capability to dish it out, based on situational pressure, specific circumstances etc.

I would love to test Japan's pacifist nature, push them to the limit, if they dont resort to violence in some way, than i take back what i said. [only hypothetical]

history shows

rome = gladiators   = entertainment

Neanderthal killing to survive

Jonan im curious, you dont watch boxing or other full contact sports?



i lost my racquet

Schlager u beast

http://www.youtube.com/MDSguy

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jpenmaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:30pm
That is the one thing about MMA i hate i have broken my nose 3 times so far!! It is just one of those things that is going to happen in MMA along with the cuts and bruises. The last time i got my nose broke was from a high kick. I though he missed but actually clipped the bridge of my nose with his big toe! I think i really freaked everyone out when i reset my nose in one of mirrors at the gym. I think my insurance company is starting to wonder what is going on. I just tell the people at the hospital my wife beats me .    : ) . Yeah taking people to the ground in a street fight is dangerous. Not always for the BJJ guy but for some reason " street fighters" like to crack there head on the ground when taken down and this can get you in a lot of legal trouble.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jonan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:37pm
Originally posted by theman theman wrote:


i think its in human nature to enjoy violence, on ALL LEVELS, everyone has the capability to dish it out, based on situational pressure, specific circumstances etc. I would love to test Japan's pacifist nature, push them to the limit, if they dont resort to violence in some way, than i take back what i said.

Jonan im curious, you dont watch boxing or other full contact sports?


"Human nature" is a made up blanket term. It doesn't mean something is right or wrong if you try to hide something behind it. To say that violence is right because it's human nature is like saying pedophilia is right because lust is part of human nature. Consent doesn't make it right, particularly when other people are harmed as part of the action. I overcame that part of my "human nature" when I came out of puberty. I physically harmed my brothers twice when I was a teenager but I haven't touched anyone, no matter how enraged, since.

No, I don't watch full contact sports, of course I have seen them, people have them on the tv at the gym or there's a karate or grappling class going on, but I don't watch it myself.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote doraemon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:41pm
Anton, it seems like my answers got erased by accident.  I write it again....

OK, I see what you meant now.

By the way, one thing that I still disagree is that you said that the ground is a great equalizer.  Small guy can dominate big guy, given he has the skill.  I agree with this.  But given the same skill, I would say there is no way 48 kg guy can dominate 98 kg opponent.  I think that is why there is weight division in Judo.  And even if there is a free class, most (if not all of them) are won by heavy-weight guy.  All participants in the free class are all world class athletes and given the almost equal skill, weight is the dominant factor.

I remember reading an article long time ago, complaining that the beautiful art of Judo performed by Japanese are destroyed by the brutal force of European Judo athletes who dominate the heavier weight class.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nachalnik Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:42pm
In this day and age you have to be nuts to be a "street fighter". Too many people with guns, knives and other crap. This is why fast strikes, especially hand strikes to the face and low kicks are preferrable. And then, try to get the hell out of there as fast as you can as the statistics show that less than 20% of gun shots actually hit a moving target. If, however, you're a part of the 20%, oh well...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Chigurh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2010 at 10:50pm
Originally posted by nachalnik nachalnik wrote:

Well, I'm a second degree black belt in Kenpo and I've been doing it for quite some time. I also did a little of BJJ, Russian sambo and have been in a fair share of street fights. The problem with BJJ, as opposed to boxing or kenpo is that the last thing you want to do in a bar or street is to grapple with somebody. There's hard pavement, there's broken glass, there could be friends of a guy you're fighting standing around and just waiting for you to take it to the ground so they can kick the s**t out of you. The best thing in street fights is to remain standing. This is where boxing/ karate/ Muay Thai are pretty handy.  

 
I disagree, but that's fine. In my younger days, I was in many "street fights", the majority in which grappling was far more useful than striking--especially if I needed to end the altercation without brutality.
 
EDIT: Due in part to my own fault, this conversation has moved away from MMA and into street fighting talk. I'm not as comfortable with that, so I'm gonna respectfully remove myself from the conversation. Thanks to all, though! Good fun.
 
 
 
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