Alex Table Tennis - MyTableTennis.NET Homepage
  Help Desk Help Desk  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - FH and BH loop help
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

FH and BH loop help

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
amkrad1 View Drop Down
Beginner
Beginner


Joined: 03/20/2012
Location: California
Status: Offline
Points: 14
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amkrad1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: FH and BH loop help
    Posted: 10/10/2012 at 2:44am
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTs55nXELkg&feature=plcp

OK folks,

would love all and any tips you can recommend...

this was a recent drill session. Pardon the quality (iphone) and positioning of the camera is totally suboptimal but it was as best I could do at the time and place.

Would love tips esp on BH but also FH...

I was pretty tired by this point from extensive practice prior as well so i know my footwork was a bit sluggish (or very sluggish as some may say)

I've been playing TT for 8mos and currently am 1685 rating USATT after 1st tourney

Thanks in advance.


Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
racquetsforsale View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 10/02/2010
Location: at the table
Status: Offline
Points: 1266
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote racquetsforsale Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/10/2012 at 3:52am
If you were a raw beginner 8 months ago, you are a natural and have made tremendous progress! One comment regarding your BH loop --- flex and then extend your wrist a bit more to give the stroke additional snap and spin. During preparation, place the elbow out in front of your body while bringing the blade near your abs and flex your wrist to point the tip of the blade near the center of your abs. Pivot your forearm from the elbow and quickly extend your wrist through contact to brush the ball.
Back to Top
Leshxa View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 01/03/2009
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1917
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Leshxa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/10/2012 at 11:56am
I think you are doing well, but your balance and footwork need more focus. I wouldn't worry about the wrist yet. You're looping the ball late and the wrist is not really needed. As a matter of fact, less use of the wrist will give you better timing and consistency at this point.

What I do think you should revisit is your approach the ball. when you are using your backhand, your balance shifts further to the right after each shot and even though your feet and knees are not static ( you use hips and knees well ), you do not position yourself within you desired range for the ball - hence you somewhat reach to the right for the next shot.

On the forehand, it is even more evident that you reach because you see your right foot point, which means that you did not step to the ball, but reached for it. If you tried to do a backhand/forehand sequence alternating your training partner to give you a shot wide to the forehand, then wide to the backhand, you will miss the 3rd shot for sure.

I wouldn't practice against such a wide forehand ball. I think your linking of backhand and forehand needs to be trained with more footwork movement, but with less distance. It will teach you to move without reaching ( since the ball won't be too wide ) and will prevent you from developing bad habits.

Good luck.
Back to table tennis...
Back to Top
racquetsforsale View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 10/02/2010
Location: at the table
Status: Offline
Points: 1266
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote racquetsforsale Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/10/2012 at 2:31pm
Different learning approach I guess, Leshxa. For me, until I started making use of my wrist, my BH loop was inconsistent and felt very awkward whenever I didn't hit on the diagonal. In my opinion, the involvement of the wrist is not so much an advanced element of the stroke as it is a crucial element of the arm motion that delivers the proper brushing contact needed for looping. Keep in mind I'm not talking about focusing on the wrist and flicking it to power the stroke, for that is advanced. I'm merely talking about involving the wrist and not locking it during the stroke. Let it flex and let it extend and roll.
Back to Top
NextLevel View Drop Down
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: 12/15/2011
Location: Somewhere Good
Status: Offline
Points: 13390
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/10/2012 at 6:00pm
Originally posted by racquetsforsale racquetsforsale wrote:

Different learning approach I guess, Leshxa. For me, until I started making use of my wrist, my BH loop was inconsistent and felt very awkward whenever I didn't hit on the diagonal. In my opinion, the involvement of the wrist is not so much an advanced element of the stroke as it is a crucial element of the arm motion that delivers the proper brushing contact needed for looping. Keep in mind I'm not talking about focusing on the wrist and flicking it to power the stroke, for that is advanced. I'm merely talking about involving the wrist and not locking it during the stroke. Let it flex and let it extend and roll.


Leshxa should agree with you - at least, I think his coach would :D.
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
Mazunov
FH: TBD (MX-S, C1)
BH: C1
Lumberjack TT, not for lovers of beautiful strokes. No time to train...
Back to Top
Anton Chigurh View Drop Down
Premier Member
Premier Member
Avatar

Joined: 09/15/2009
Status: Offline
Points: 3959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Chigurh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/10/2012 at 6:34pm
I dunno... just for the sake of discussion, I'd have to agree with Leshxa. My first coach said not to worry about the wrist motion at first. It comes later and more naturally after you've developed other parts of the stroke first. He said focusing on the wrist movement (in the beginning stages) will only confuse the matter and make the stroke less stable.

I also had Stellan Bengtsson tell me something similar. Specifically, he said that when speaking with Persson (his "go-to" backhand guy), Persson said the only joint he really thought about when performing a backhand was the elbow. Any wrist movement just followed naturally.

I'm slightly oversimplifying, but from what I've gathered and based on my experience, I'd say that Leshxa's advice is sound. But everyone varies and some things will be easier for some people to learn while other things will be harder, etc.


Back to Top
SeeReed View Drop Down
Super Member
Super Member
Avatar

Joined: 09/20/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 210
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SeeReed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/10/2012 at 6:43pm
You only play TT for 8mo and with rating USATT 1685. That is impressive. keep up the good work. If you have a coach, both you and you coach is doing very good job. If you don't have a coach. It's time for you find a coach to play even better.
Back to Top
Leshxa View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 01/03/2009
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1917
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Leshxa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/10/2012 at 8:03pm
Originally posted by Anton Chigurh Anton Chigurh wrote:


I also had Stellan Bengtsson tell me something similar. Specifically, he said that when speaking with Persson (his "go-to" backhand guy), Persson said the only joint he really thought about when performing a backhand was the elbow. Any wrist movement just followed naturally



Super!!! Clap

+ 1000000

I am not suggesting completely stopping the use of the wrist, but at least stop focusing on it. The wrist is the last body part in the whole stroke movement, so focusing to learn it first I feel is a much harder way of developing the technique.
Back to table tennis...
Back to Top
NextLevel View Drop Down
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: 12/15/2011
Location: Somewhere Good
Status: Offline
Points: 13390
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/10/2012 at 11:11pm
I agree with raquetsforsale on this one - not using the wrist makes a backhand more unstable than using it if you want to deliver strokes with pace because they can't generate serious spin without it.  If someone lacks a powerful backhand, it tends to be the wrist that is missing not the elbow. Moreover, I agree with racquetsforsale that it is clearly a missing element in OP's stroke.


Edited by NextLevel - 10/10/2012 at 11:11pm
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
Mazunov
FH: TBD (MX-S, C1)
BH: C1
Lumberjack TT, not for lovers of beautiful strokes. No time to train...
Back to Top
racquetsforsale View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 10/02/2010
Location: at the table
Status: Offline
Points: 1266
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote racquetsforsale Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/11/2012 at 3:57am
I guess it is different for everyone. For me, the wrist was the missing link in my BH loop. Some oldschool BH styles do feature a flexed though fixed wrist and more swinging from the shoulder as well. I hope the OP finds what will help him improve his execution and consistency.

Whenever I feel my BH loop is off during practice, I reset by control looping over the table with just the wrist while my partner blocks for me. Once I get that timing down, I slowly move back and start incorporating my forearm, shoulder, and the rest of my body into the stroke. I also warmup my BH loop this way. This is probably an atypical approach as most folks probably proceed in the opposite direction, ending not starting with the wrist.




Edited by racquetsforsale - 10/11/2012 at 4:08am
Back to Top
amkrad1 View Drop Down
Beginner
Beginner


Joined: 03/20/2012
Location: California
Status: Offline
Points: 14
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amkrad1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/11/2012 at 4:32am
Thanks for the helpful hints...
yeah when I see the 2000+ and pros no doubt there is WAY more wrist...

also one thing is getting that "cocked" forearm back with the blade pointing into the gut:
im 5'7"  and with not very long arms... seems that I almost don't have enough room to stick the elbow out and wrist IN properly unless i bend even more foreward (perhaps I am still to upright??)

I don't want to be off balence and too far forward just to get the elbow way out to allow the wrist in and eventually getting that SNAP of hte forearm uncorking with the wrist flowing naturally...

any tips?

also re: forehand footwork.. yeah the wide balls were tough esp at end of practice session... any good hints on footwork drills or sites for footwork drills?

THANKS AGAIN FOR EVERYONE TAKING A PEEK AND CHIMING IN! I do appreciate it.

amkrad1
Back to Top
racquetsforsale View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 10/02/2010
Location: at the table
Status: Offline
Points: 1266
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote racquetsforsale Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/11/2012 at 5:19am


Hope this helps.

And this.




Edited by racquetsforsale - 10/11/2012 at 5:21am
Back to Top
lamb636 View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 09/26/2012
Status: Offline
Points: 38
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lamb636 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/11/2012 at 5:45am
That video by William Henzell (ttedge) is really good and helpful (but then, that might just be biased because I'm Australian )! LOL Thanks for posting it racquetsforsale!
Back to Top
purple View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 11/10/2004
Location: Germany
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote purple Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/11/2012 at 6:33am
Originally posted by amkrad1 amkrad1 wrote:

Would love tips esp on BH but also FH...

Thanks in advance.
FH looks technically better than BH, but the view angle wasn't good enough to really make a statement here.

Your BH:
Don't think about the wrist until your BH is stable. 

1. Concentrate on your underarm turn. The faster the better. Your arm is verrrrrrrrrrrrrry verrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrry slow at the moment -> poor stability and quality. 

2. The most important thing is to keep the elbow static otherwise you lose spin and control. You don't do this right now. 

3. Don't move your shoulder up during the stroke. Just turn your underarm around your elbow and concentrate on hitting the ball where the racket it the fastest i. e. in the middle of the underarm swing.

4. Your BH rubber seems to be way too fast. Get yourself a slow soft classical rubber like Sriver FX 1.7mm. This is much better for learning.


Edited by purple - 10/11/2012 at 6:37am
Back to Top
racquetsforsale View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 10/02/2010
Location: at the table
Status: Offline
Points: 1266
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote racquetsforsale Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/11/2012 at 11:15am
Originally posted by lamb636 lamb636 wrote:

That video by William Henzell (ttedge) is really good and helpful (but then, that might just be biased because I'm Australian )! LOL Thanks for posting it racquetsforsale!


No problem, lamb636. That's just one among many other good instructional videos members on this forum have discovered and posted.
Back to Top
amkrad1 View Drop Down
Beginner
Beginner


Joined: 03/20/2012
Location: California
Status: Offline
Points: 14
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amkrad1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/12/2012 at 12:08am
Purple:

by UNDERARM TURN (see below) do you mean forearm  (below the elbow but above wrist)?

current FH and BH rubber BTW is RAKZA 7 and perhaps I could try slower rubbers but so far my imrpovement in 8+ mos has been with TENERGY 05's for mos 0-4 then Rakza 7 after that... if I keep this trend i will end up wtih anti rubber in 3 years... ;P

Seriously, sure I could/should play with perhaps slower rubber but I can't say that my success so far has been poor with these 'faster' rubbers. I also happen to be a very respectible blocker so having a faster rubber is helpful for those blocking shots as well...

As a former tennis player I do know I use too much "shoulder" currently in my BH and I do think concentrating on rotating around the ELBOW axis (and ideally wrist curling and snappnig back) is the way to go..

Do you have drills you can suggest for me? esp FH to BH
Other tips?

thanks again!

amkrad1




Back to Top
purple View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 11/10/2004
Location: Germany
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote purple Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/12/2012 at 7:14am
Yes, quick forearm rotation around a static elbow (under arm is German I'm sorry :) )

For drills at your level I suggest what we call "mill" i. e. one player always plays parallel balls, the other only plays diagonal. Then change after some time. There are many good drills, but at your point in development you should mostly focus on proper shot production.

Other tips? Yes, get yourself a proper beginner racket like Yasaka Extra with Sriver L 2,1 FH and Sriver FX 1.9 BH. With your current racket you don't learn good technique because the racket plays for itself in your case and you don't play with the racket. It's the typical beginner mistake. They all think that the coaches are idiots, of course they can handle the rackets and make good progress but this is a very bad illusion that leads to bad technical deficiencies that will take tons of hard work to fix later on if they are fixable at all.
Back to Top
V-Griper View Drop Down
Silver Member
Silver Member
Avatar

Joined: 09/19/2011
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 867
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote V-Griper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/12/2012 at 10:29am
Most of your stroke problems, which are relatively minor, stem from transference issues with tennis. This is fairly common with players who have a background in other racquet sports. 
On your FH you are not accustomed to the mass difference between a T racquet and a TT paddle. In tennis you have to manage the relatively large mass of the racquet so there is more of a step and lean in the direction of the stroke. On your BH I would guess that in tennis you have a one handed bh. In tennis you normally step across your body with your left foot(since your a lefty) and pull your left arm back and rotate/extend outward to ball contact. Again this is useful because of the masses involved. However in TT stepping across your body would be a major waste of time and is unnecessary. Obviously you don't do that but you still reach across you body as if you are making a tennis stroke.

FH- 
I think allot of the issues can be resolved by adjustments in how you hold your right arm, which is counter balancing your stroke arm. Bend more at the elbow 90' or slightly less, keep it closer to your torso, and your right palm is close to touching your rib cage. This is just a rough guide so don't clamp your arm to your side but it should make your stroke more comfortable and mitigate excessive leaning and lunging towards the ball. 

 BH- Same thing with the right arm. This is, in part, a movement and position problem because you used to stepping out with your left foot from tennis. It's hard to tell from the camera angle but I think you are not standing far enough over on your BH side of the table. Your body should, generally, be between the center line and the right side line. A ball to your backhand should be received such that an imaginary line can be drawn from the center of the ball, through the center of your paddle and then through the center of your sternum. The movement too the ball should be a side/shuffle step. This applies to your current BH stroke. If you start to use more rotation in your stroke then you will need to move the paddle over to your right side a little more.


To wrist or not to wrist that is question whether tis nobler in the mind...

There are, in fact, two different fundamental approaches to doing your BH. One involves using more wrist which has the benefit of producing good spin and speed but introduces timing problems. The other is, primarily, an arm BH which holds the wrist relatively stable and generates force by swinging the arm as a whole(mostly forearm), not as fast or spiny. The later is what you are currently doing. I think this is more than adequate at your level and above primarily because most people you play are going to be hitting FH's into your BH, so borrowing the energy from the incoming shot and controlling it is very effective. An example of this kind of "arm" BH is WLQ. 

Ultimately it is a continuum so it's not about one or the other but having the ability execute the entire range. This is where the top players are. Ma Long and Zhang Jike have the entire range.

Note: ML's use of his left arm is very much worth studying. Compared to most other players his left arm manipulation is very precise. It counter balances his strokes almost perfectly. Other players look like they are flailing by comparison. 

Note: When someone exhibits unusually fast development it is almost always because they have some prior skill that is somewhat transferable. 
YE JTTAA
Yinhe Big dipper FH/BH
Back to Top
amkrad1 View Drop Down
Beginner
Beginner


Joined: 03/20/2012
Location: California
Status: Offline
Points: 14
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amkrad1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/12/2012 at 3:49pm

Vgriper

 
THANKS SO MUCH.
 
Yes I totally agree w/ BH-- I dont hit a 1 handed BH in conventional (non-table) tennis, I do hit my current BH more like a tennis shot then I should... I couldn't figure why until now w/ aid of video but always felt it was too much shoulder (like a 1 handed BH like Federer would hit).
 
I think your tips will be IMMENSELY helpful and can't wait to try them out on both sides esp the non-dominant (for me R) arm to position better/more efficiently to also aid in stroke production.
 
I would love to have a ZJK BH (who wouldn't) or ML and the keying in on the non-dominant arm wasn't even something I had thought to consider...
 
SO MUCH TO STILL LEARN :)... I guess after <1 yr and minimal coaching I don't know why I would expect otherwise... unfortunately for me, I live >90 mi from any coaching at all and >120mi from serious coaching...  oh well.
 
thanks again
 
amkrad1
Back to Top
pingpongpaddy View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 06/27/2006
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1260
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pingpongpaddy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/12/2012 at 7:12pm
hi amrak
its a pity the video isnt from a better angle. From the limited info available, i would say you have a pretty good idea of what a fh drive should be and the backhand, but you have some technical issue, primarily caused by poor movement and positioning.
A key principle for footwork is not to stretch for your shots and your backhand suffers the most. You dont seem to play the backhand from the center of your body but rather out to the side.
A good exercise to fix this is to get your practice partner feed block the ball, -1 to bh corner, 1 centre line, repeat at steady pace
your task would be to play each ball with yr backhand, taking care to get the center of yr body behind the ball for each shot
once you are comfortable doing that, get yr partner to feed the ball randomly still to just those 2 positions aim at least 20 good returns
This will get you moving properly, and it may eliminate some of the stroke faults occurring on the video as some of them are caused by stretching. rather than moving to the ball.
If you find it too difficult at first, to maintain control of the above exercise do it pushing to begin with, as the key fundamental is learning to move behind the line of the shot on the backhand.
Once you master the above you progress you can try alternate bhs and Fhs and eventually the famous Falkenberg drill, though you'll need a partner with a very good block.
good luck
inactive dotec carbokev

yin he galaxy 1 p
ly

FH moristo sp AX MAX

bh moristo sp ax max
Back to Top
amkrad1 View Drop Down
Beginner
Beginner


Joined: 03/20/2012
Location: California
Status: Offline
Points: 14
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amkrad1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/13/2012 at 3:51am
Thanks PP -Daddy...

great tips as well..

I didn't realize until looking at the videos (Hentzell ML ZJK) how much more "aligned" in front of the ball (ie ball is nearly directly in front of them if they can) when they hit... I hit my ball much more to my right shoulder or on occasion even further rightward...

will definitely work on some footwork drills to get that to be better and AT ALL COSTS get that dang wrist flexed with the paddle hitting into my gut so I can uncork and let it flow and brush across the ball for maximum spin and speed...

I am a decent blocker but my innate game is double looping and more aggressive by nature so I really want a killer BH if I can...

Thanks again for the tips.

amkrad1
Back to Top
lamb636 View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 09/26/2012
Status: Offline
Points: 38
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lamb636 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/13/2012 at 5:21am
Originally posted by V-Griper V-Griper wrote:

Most of your stroke problems, which are relatively minor, stem from transference issues with tennis. This is fairly common with players who have a background in other racquet sports. 
On your FH you are not accustomed to the mass difference between a T racquet and a TT paddle. In tennis you have to manage the relatively large mass of the racquet so there is more of a step and lean in the direction of the stroke. On your BH I would guess that in tennis you have a one handed bh. In tennis you normally step across your body with your left foot(since your a lefty) and pull your left arm back and rotate/extend outward to ball contact. Again this is useful because of the masses involved. However in TT stepping across your body would be a major waste of time and is unnecessary. Obviously you don't do that but you still reach across you body as if you are making a tennis stroke.

Note: When someone exhibits unusually fast development it is almost always because they have some prior skill that is somewhat transferable. 

As a keen tennis player that is so true. I struggle to play both tennis and table tennis, but I have to play 9 hrs tennis a week for school and that comes first sadly. At first I was playing way better than people who had played as much table tennis as me (very little at that point), but soon I had to reconstruct my whole game, as even my grip was terrible. After a long session of either table tennis or tennis, going to the other sport always takes a few minutes to get my head around. My table tennis technique still probably has a few areas that slightly resemble a tennis shot. But imo they are two of the most enjoyable sports ever, both fun and rewarding in their own way, so I still play both.
Back to Top
pingpongpaddy View Drop Down
Gold Member
Gold Member


Joined: 06/27/2006
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1260
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pingpongpaddy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/13/2012 at 7:50am
Originally posted by amkrad1 amkrad1 wrote:

Thanks PP -Daddy...great tips as well


Amkrad1
I am a paddy not a daddy! but you can call me 'ppp'
Re 'killer bh' bear in mind that because the sideways reach of the bh is much less(due to the need to face the table and the fact that stretching on bh can cause you to turn back on table, which is a complete no no).

For this reason you should first develop a game which allocates 2 thirds of the table to Fh and 1 third to BH especially away from the table. (which is what falkenberg helps you develop)
After you have got those fundamentals down pat you can think about 'killer bh'
A good analogy is from mountaineering:- In climbing Everest, the climber must not look at the summit but rather concentrate on each foothold individually along the way!
good luck
inactive dotec carbokev

yin he galaxy 1 p
ly

FH moristo sp AX MAX

bh moristo sp ax max
Back to Top
amkrad1 View Drop Down
Beginner
Beginner


Joined: 03/20/2012
Location: California
Status: Offline
Points: 14
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amkrad1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/13/2012 at 10:42am
PPP,

actually that is what I already do... I run around my backhand frequently and always practice hitting inside-out both blocking and looping of my backhand court with my forehand to both a righty forehand (inside out) and righty bakhand "down the line"...

I also take/receive serves opp method to allow me to do ZJK side-top flicks when possible as my opening loops for those are better vs FH flick at this point.

Definitely will have homework to work on for BH for now...

meanwhile last night won my RR and beat a few 1800 players anyway even w/ my subpar stroke production ;)

Back to Top
V-Griper View Drop Down
Silver Member
Silver Member
Avatar

Joined: 09/19/2011
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 867
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote V-Griper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/14/2012 at 12:35am
Originally posted by amkrad1 amkrad1 wrote:

I would love to have a ZJK BH (who wouldn't) or ML and the keying in on the non-dominant arm wasn't even something I had thought to consider...

If your are trying to imitate ZJK's BH, especially his flip, be aware that his grip is somewhat more BH biased than most players. Imo this goes a long way towards helping him make his shots. The penalty he pays is that his FH has some limitations. Especially when you compare his FH to ML's, who has a more neutral or only slight BH biased grip. 
YE JTTAA
Yinhe Big dipper FH/BH
Back to Top
Swiff View Drop Down
Platinum Member
Platinum Member
Avatar

Joined: 06/09/2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 2587
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Swiff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/15/2012 at 4:41am
Originally posted by amkrad1 amkrad1 wrote:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTs55nXELkg&feature=plcp

OK folks,

would love all and any tips you can recommend...

this was a recent drill session. Pardon the quality (iphone) and positioning of the camera is totally suboptimal but it was as best I could do at the time and place.

Would love tips esp on BH but also FH...

I was pretty tired by this point from extensive practice prior as well so i know my footwork was a bit sluggish (or very sluggish as some may say)

I've been playing TT for 8mos and currently am 1685 rating USATT after 1st tourney

Thanks in advance.





Doing great so far, keep it up!

When newer players tell me they want to use stroke, I kind of take the easy way out.  I'm usually very patient, but get frustrated trying to teach stroke.  xD

I refer the player to videos like the ones racquetsforsale posted above.  That way, they can work on their stroke on their own time and they know they're aiming in the right direction.  Then I'll correct or tell them what to adjust and have them rewatch and study the videos and continue mirror practicing.

This is the way I did it.  I watched the pros play or watched training videos and noticed stroke.  Then I practiced in the mirror til it looked similar.  I still get compliments on my proper stroke.  :]

Of course, the best method is to get some coaching.  But if you can't afford it, like myself, then I recommend my method.


Edited by Swiff - 10/15/2012 at 4:43am
Back to Top
power7 View Drop Down
Silver Member
Silver Member


Joined: 01/25/2012
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 745
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote power7 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/17/2012 at 1:09am
I don't really see that many loops in your practice sessions.  Most of the BH and FH are just tospin counter hits.  

Footwork needs to improve, more bouncing on the hits.  More torquing of the trunk is needed.  More leg lifting is needed, started with you eyes at net level and then lift up with your legs when you start your swings.

The basics are there, but loops are heavy top spin balls kick off the table.  Just hitting a topspin when your 3 feet off the table is not really a high quality loop.  With more practice I see the potential for you to become a better looper.
DHS PG-7, H3 Neo, 729-5

Butterfly Power-7, Red TG2 Neo 39degree, Black Donic Bluefire M1
Back to Top
smackman View Drop Down
Assistant Moderator
Assistant Moderator
Avatar

Joined: 07/20/2009
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 3242
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote smackman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/17/2012 at 8:22am
I don't see too many drills of doing 3 backhand loops/hits as you move left and then do a reaching forehand

wouldn't it be better to be doing many backhands with the occasional pivot forehand or a backhand and two forehands? 
just saying better formatted drills may help you
Ulmo Duality,Donic BlueGrip C2 red max ,Yinhe Super Kim Ox Black
NZ table tennis selector, third in the World (plate Doubles)I'm Listed on the ITTF website
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.155 seconds.

Become a Fan on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Web Wiz News
Forum Home | Go to the Forums | Forum Help | Disclaimer

MyTableTennis.NET is the trading name of Alex Table Tennis Ltd.

Copyright ©2003-2020 Alex Table Tennis Ltd. All rights reserved.